The Random Guardian, May 1965, Page 8

      

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE THUMB (cont'd from overleaf)

We didn't wait long at our strategic points before we got a ride to Amherst. On arriving we inquired about routes as we had left our road map in Sackville, and finding the road out of town we were off again. Three rides later we were in Pictou and again we located ourselves at Elaine's strategic position, and almost immediately we were on our way again.

At 6.00 after three more rides, we arrived at North Sydney quite in time to catch the boat for Newfoundland which left at 12.00

So far the journey had been pleasant and comfortable as we had the full cooperation of the weather and the motorists. However, the trip across Newfoundland was quite a different story.

Port Aux Basques, with its sub zero weather and a sleety snow falling at 8.30 in the morning, was not a pleasant sight to a weary traveller's eyes. However, with characteristic determination we braved the elements and stationed ourselves on the highway, fortified with the knowledge of Nfld. hospitality, and the well known fact that anyone leaving the boat is either driving across Nfld. or as far as Corner Brook anyway, and certainly wants 3 female hitch hikers to brighten his road.

Well, that morning we camel to the conclusion that Nfld. hospitality is a myth created by the Tourist Development Board to lure unsuspecting mainlanders to the Province, because the only evidence we saw Hof any goodwill existing in Nfld. was a number of grins from passing motorists.

Finally our plight was alleviated by a Nova Scotian couple who picked us up and boosted our morale with the following comments:- Clarenville!!! You'll never make it! You're crazy! You'll freeze! - and drove off leaving us in the middle of nowhere with this cheerful reminder It's going to snow tomorrow!

The situation was indeed much worse than the previous one. I was without gloves, Pudge was without socks, and the temperature was falling steadily. To make a bad matter worse' there were no cars in sight.